7 notes

quixoticandbarefoot:

Those of you who unschool, what state (or country, if you’re out of the US) do you live in and how do you get around state homeschooling laws (if there are any)? If  you’re in a state with few homeschool regulations, please brag here.

We don’t really have much of a problem where I live (NC), but I had a help page up for this sort of thing (sorry it used to be on Yahoo when they deleted the webpages, I saved the info at the link - noting that some of the links might be dead http://a2zhomeschool.com/thenextgeneration/educationese/ ) … so basically, those who need to keep records just use educationese jargon and keep a track of their child’s activities.
Hope that helps.

412 notes

mydrunkkitchen:

Having one of those days where I just sit at my computer and sign postcards and listen to people put ideas into words into actions. Here’s my latest fave:

"What if we trusted you?"
Discussion on unschooling and the potential of trust.

(Source: mydrunkkitchen)

11,675 notes

What many people do not know is that the use of standardized tests has its origins in the Eugenics movement, where basic tenets assert that certain races are inferior to others biologically and intellectually.

Karen Lewis, President of the Chicago Teachers Union

Standardized testing and the Eugenics movement »

A MUST read by Chicago Teachers Union president Karen Lewis. Standardized testing isn’t about improving education, it’s a way for the system to sort out which kids are meant to succeed and which are destined failure.

(via socialismartnature)

1,153 notes

Socializing is as exhausting as giving blood. People assume we loners are misanthropes, just sitting thinking, ‘Oh, people are such a bunch of assholes,’ but it’s really not like that. We just have a smaller tolerance for what it takes to be with others. It means having to perform. I get so tired of communicating.
Anneli Rufus (via vegetable)

(via persephonesunset)

2 notes

Right Now You Are Activating Change

attitude change saves world, global consciousness, gay rights, human rights, change makers,

by Laura Grace Weldon

My mother tried throughout her pregnancies to get hospitals and doctors to change their rules. She wanted a natural birth, she wanted her husband with her, she wanted to hold her babies after they were born. Instead regulations were followed— every decision excluding her. That meant her labors were induced, she was given painkillers, my father had to stay in the waiting room, and except for standard in-room hours her babies were kept apart from her in the hospital nursery. Such procedures made it easier for the institution and less trouble for doctors.

By the time I had babies her futile requests were standard policy. Every woman was encouraged to have one or more support people with her, to room in with her baby, and to give birth naturally. It took change-makers to turn those policies around. Those change-makers were ordinary people who had a vision of something better. Some of them actively worked to see those changes happen but I suspect most of them simply talked, read, wrote, and otherwise carried on with what looked like everyday lives while activating awareness in people around them.

This is how real progress happens. Yes, there’s the much cited quote by Margaret Mead, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” And yes, there are torchbearers for our big changes who are often misunderstood, even persecuted, while they lead the way. But lets not assume that we don’t qualify as “thoughtful, committed citizens” if we aren’t at the front of any movement. It’s about action but it’s also about attitude. Those attitudes make justice, ecological harmony, and peace possible… [more]

Filed under Activating Change Laura Grace Weldon natural birth attachment parenting unschooling homeschooling

23,063 notes

8 Reasons Young Americans Don’t Fight Back: How the US Crushed Youth Resistance

abaldwin360:

itsaboxaballoons:

disquietingtruths:

  1. Student-Loan Debt.
  2. Psychopathologizing and Medicating Noncompliance.
  3. Schools That Educate for Compliance and Not for Democracy.
  4. No Child Left Behind” and “Race to the Top.”
  5. Shaming Young People Who Take EducationBut Not Their SchoolingSeriously.
  6. The Normalization of Surveillance.
  7. Television.
  8. Fundamentalist Religion and Fundamentalist Consumerism.

Read More

soul crushing

Read this. Then think about your life and current events. It’ll all snap into place, just like when you get the long piece in tetris. 

(Source: filmsforaction.org, via abaldwin360-deactivated20130708)

11 notes

We have completely isolated young people from adults and created a peer culture. We stick them in school and keep them from working in any meaningful way, and if they do something wrong we put them in a pen with other “children.” In most nonindustrialized societies, young people are integrated into adult society as soon as they are capable, and there is no sign of teen turmoil. Many cultures do not even have a term for adolescence. But we not only created this stage of life: We declared it inevitable ~ Robert Epstein
[Related:  Trashing Teens Psychologist Robert Epstein spoke to Psychology Today’s Hara Estroff Marano about the legal and emotional constraints on American youth]

We have completely isolated young people from adults and created a peer culture. We stick them in school and keep them from working in any meaningful way, and if they do something wrong we put them in a pen with other “children.” In most nonindustrialized societies, young people are integrated into adult society as soon as they are capable, and there is no sign of teen turmoil. Many cultures do not even have a term for adolescence. But we not only created this stage of life: We declared it inevitable ~ Robert Epstein

[Related:  Trashing Teens Psychologist Robert Epstein spoke to Psychology Today’s Hara Estroff Marano about the legal and emotional constraints on American youth]

(Source: facebook.com)

Filed under unschooling homeschooling adolescence teens